Friday, May 26, 2017

First Copperhead of Season

I saw the first copperhead snake of the season. Longest one I have seen. It was on my neighbor's drive. Since she is still in Japan, I cleaned it up. I was puzzled how it got there and in that condition, until I decided it had been run over and then dragged through the gate by a cat. It was so thoroughly torn up that I had to scrape it up and then water hose the pavement. Lucky my dog Rocky didn't find this one. He has been known to go after these things and keep at it even when getting repeatedly bitten on the snout.

I kill at least two or more of those things every year. When first I moved here, twenty years ago, we had lots of racers, but the last one I saw was about four years back. It was huge. Also had one coral snake. I had to take it away from a dog to kill it.

It seemed like country living, early on, here, but we are in the middle of the Kuykendahl surge, near the Grand Parkway. All of the wildlife is being killed off or is pulling back, in the face of stores and shops, apartments and subdivisions. We are downtown, these days.

Saturday, May 6, 2017

Why do Democrats keep losing?

https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2017/05/why-cant-the-left-win/522102/?utm_source=atlfb
What follows is a roundup of critiques offered in that spirit. It is neither exhaustive nor definitive. But I hope that it can serve a starting point for an informative conversation.

The Limits of Opprobrium and Stigma

When Abraham Lincoln was 33 years old, he gave a speech inside a Presbyterian church to a temperance society. His message: The assembled ought to be nicer to drinkers and sellers of alcohol, rather than shunning them, or denouncing them as moral pestilences. Indeed, they ought to use “kindly persuasion,” even if a man’s drunkenness had caused misery to his wife, or left his children hungry and naked with want.

For people are never less likely to change, to convert to new ways of thinking or acting, than when it means joining the ranks of their denouncers.

To expect otherwise, “to have expected them not to meet denunciation with denunciation ... and anathema with anathema, was to expect a reversal of human nature,” Lincoln explained. “If you would win a man to your cause, first convince him that you are his sincere friend. Therein is a drop of honey that catches his heart, which, say what he will, is the great highroad to his reason, and when once gained, you will find but little trouble in convincing his judgment of the justice of your cause.”

However, Lincoln cautioned, dictate to a man’s judgment, command his action, or mark him to be despised, “and he will retreat within himself, close all the avenues to his head and his heart. And even though your cause be naked truth itself, transformed to the heaviest lance, harder than steel, and sharper than steel can be made, and though you throw it with more than Herculean force and precision, you shall be no more be able to pierce him, than to penetrate the hard shell of a tortoise with a rye straw.”


It was and remains extremely counterproductive for the left to treat Trump supporters as a “basket of deplorables,” especially given how tiny a percentage of his followers would need to be converted away from the president to reorient political power in Washington, D.C. For directing me to a Lincoln speech I’d never read before, I thank Andrew Sullivan, who quoted it to support the argument that “you will not arrest the reactionary momentum by ignoring it or dismissing it entirely as a function of bigotry or stupidity. You’ll only defuse it by appreciating its insights and co-opting its appeal.”

Forget What Is “Normal”

A typical objection to calls to contest reactionary premises on the merits, and to persuade adherents of reaction, is that doing so somehow validates their ideas. “Among many liberals, there is an understandable impulse to raise the drawbridge, to deny certain ideas access to respectable conversation, to prevent certain concepts from being ‘normalized,’” Sullivan wrote, anticipating the objection. “But the normalization has already occurred — thanks, largely, to voters across the West — and willfully blinding ourselves to the most potent political movement of the moment will not make it go away. Our job in these circumstances is not to condescend but to engage — or forfeit the politics of the moment (and the future) to reaction.”

Noah Millman has fleshed out why the posture of preventing normalization is doomed:

Whoever says that Trump shouldn’t be “normalized” is implying that somebody — the press, perhaps? — is in a position to decide what is normal, and to inform everybody else of that fact. But that’s not how norms work, and neither the press nor anybody else is in a position either to grant or withhold recognition to the new government.

In fact, the word is a way of distracting from one of the crucial jobs at hand. Trump, for example, is on strong legal ground when he says that he is exempt from conflict of interest laws. But laws can be changed — and perhaps they should be. To achieve that requires making a case, not that what Trump is doing isn’t “normal,” but that it is a bad thing worth prohibiting by law. Saying “we mustn’t normalize this behavior” rather than “we need to stop this behavior” is really a way of saying that you don’t want to engage in politics, but would rather just signal to those who already agree with us just how appalled we are. And haven’t we learned already the dire consequences of substituting virtue signaling for politics?
Matt Yglesias has reached similar conclusions.“Normalization, in this context, is typically cast as a form of complicity with Trump in which the highest possible premium is placed on maintaining a rigid state of alert and warning people that he is not just another politician whom you may or may not agree with on the issues,” he wrote. “But several students of authoritarian populist movements abroad have a different message. To beat Trump, his opponents need to practice ordinary humdrum politics.”

Thursday, May 4, 2017

TRUMPCARE

To become law, Trumpcare has to go through 4 additional steps:
1. Pass an amended version in the Senate
2. Go to “conference“ to hammer out differences between the House and Senate
3. Pass in the House again
4. Pass in the Senate again
I hope you’ll be there every step of the way, until Trumpcare collapses under the weight of its own cruelty.
Here’s what you can do:
11 days of congressional recess starts today. At this very moment, your Representatives are on flights back home to your district. Over the next week they’ll be holding fundraisers and working out of their district offices. As of today, only 5 members of Congress have scheduled town halls.
First, call on them publicly to have a town hall to explain their vote on Trumpcare. If they won’t, show up at their district office and give clear feedback.
When these members are forced to vote again on Trumpcare, they will look back to the responses of their constituents this week.