Wednesday, April 14, 2021

No one has said it better.

 I need to drive my two-year-old to daycare tomorrow morning. To ensure we arrive alive, we won't take public transit (Oscar Grant). I removed all air fresheners from the vehicle and double-checked my registration status (Daunte Wright), and ensured my license plates were visible (Lt. Caron Nazario). I will be careful to follow all traffic rules (Philando Castille), signal every turn (Sandra Bland), keep the radio volume low (Jordan Davis), and won't stop at a fast food chain for a meal (Rayshard Brooks). I'm too afraid to pray (Rev. Clementa C. Pickney) so I just hope the car won't break down (Corey Jones).

When my wife picks him up at the end of the day, I'll remind her not to dance (Elijah McClain), stop to play in a park (Tamir Rice), patronize the local convenience store for snacks (Trayvon Martin), or walk around the neighborhood (Mike Brown). Once they are home, we won't stand in our backyard (Stephon Clark), eat ice cream on the couch (Botham Jean), or play any video games (Atatiana Jefferson).
After my wife and I tuck him into bed around 7:30pm, neither of us will leave the house to go to Walmart (John Crawford) or to the gym (Tshyrand Oates) or on a jog (Ahmaud Arbery). We won't even walk to see the birds (Christian Cooper). We'll just sit and try not to breathe (George Floyd) and not to sleep (Breonna Taylor)." Author unknown

Saturday, April 10, 2021

Beatles music

And I Love Her



In My Life


She's Leaving Home




Norwegian Wood




I am the Walrus












Friday, April 9, 2021

DMX

 DMX was scheduled to fight George Zimmerman in a boxing match in 2014 but Zimmerman cancelled after DMX gave this quote to TMZ.



I stole this post off of Twitter


Friday, March 19, 2021

Spring anti war Concert

Tom Paxton - Lyndon Johnson Told Me




Bill Frederick - Hey Hey LBJ





Black Sabbath - War Pigs




CCR - Fortunate Son






 Charlie Rich - Down By the Riverside


Saturday, February 27, 2021

Concert Concert



Jimmy Driftwood - The Battle of New Orleans



Johnny Cash - Ballad of Ira Hayes



 Odetta - Battle Hymn of the Republic




Hair - Full album - original Broadway cast



Saturday, February 20, 2021

POPULAR VIETNAM WAR SONGS

 RUN THROUGH THE JUNGLE




WE GOTTA GET OUTTA THIS PLACE



BALLAD OF THE GREEN BERETS


GO HIDE JOHN


UNIVERSAL SOLDIER








Saturday, February 13, 2021

Weekend Music

 Democracy is Coming



Story of Isaac



WAR WHAT IS IT GOOD FOR




TOM JOAD


Cruel War



Friday, February 5, 2021

Saturday, January 30, 2021

Concert

 



Hair original cast - Initials




Harry Belafonte - Brown Skin Girl




Phil Ochs - My Life



Lena Horne - Now

River of Shit




Wednesday, January 13, 2021

Chewing the Cud

 I don't get any joy out of Trump's impeachment. Sure, it was necessary, but it addresses no problems that confront us. Virtually everybody with any power to sway the system to do the actual people's work is oblivious to our suffering. Unless I am blind I don't see any movement to aid materially beyond applying occasional band-aides. Why do we pay so much in taxes without getting anything back?

I don't have to make lists of the failures we face. You already know. What I want to know is how do we get the rest of the public to decide "we won't take it anymore?" Without them we are being treated as the livestock of the wealthy. 

Monday, January 11, 2021

Traitors

 Release economic and racially incarcerated prisoners, such as pot convicted, to make room for the ones who would overthrow the legally elected government. Beginning with the head agitator, but including all who encouraged it, regardless of their station in life. One ought never to call for execution of any prisoners, just life without parole.

Remaining contemptuous of most other elected officials, preferring to pressure them to change or quit - never advocating to take them prisoner or build them a gallows.

Philip Wylie (1902-1971), who wrote Generation of Vipers and sci-fi novels, once told how easily a coup could be engineered. I believed him but never saw it about to be attempted before less than a month ago. I thought it more likely we would be impoverished, entertained, and brainwashed into submission by the oligarchs. Now it has been quashed, I look forward with dread to a more likely civil war or at least generalized attacks by persons of the ilk that support DJT.

I sometimes entertain a notion that Black American officials ought to be the mainstay of the government. The black people of my personal experience seem more level headed about justice and solving social problems than the rest of us. Has to be tempered by the admonition that absolute power absolutely corrupts. But I mean just for a decade or so and then allow other ethnicities to run if so inclined. Just a notion.     

Tuesday, January 5, 2021

People I Know idolize Trump

 When I was growing up a politician had to wear the liberal label to get elected. Here in Texas they mostly had to be conservatives in fact but still wear the label. Even as the safety net began to erode and the nation became less and less liberal, conservative thought had to be ridiculed when it reared its misshapen bumpy head. John Birch numbskulls. When Limbaugh began his broadcasts that made racism and conservatism publicly acceptable we had long since succumbed to Reaganism and Bushism. An evergrowing number of the working class now ridicules liberalism with the same fervor liberals did them when they had the power. As President, Trump personifies this liberation of previously repressed Country Folks Can Survive individualism and racism. People I may love otherwise post memes of Trump as a christlike figure doing the work of the people. The emotion behind this movement which has come to believe anything labeled Democrat has no right even to exist is burning white hot these days. I personally believe that only a population becoming radicalized left can swing the pendulum in the people's favor. But there has to be something tangible to stir the emotions and ease the people's fear. I also believe the time for it is now. Now or never get the chance in an increasingly fascistic state.  

Monday, January 4, 2021

What's with elected leftists?

 On Twitter the left is devouring itself it seems. Mainly over "The Squad" suddenly acting like liberals. There is no action on the progressive ideas they campaigned on. Even Bernie immediately caved when Barak "the Enforcer" Obama paid him a visit. I refuse to believe any of them abandoned their principles. There has to be some nefarious secret threat. Maybe their families were threatened. Maybe something I haven't the information and the wit to conceive. Whatever, we are in a sort of backwash at present. Leftists know what we want, just haven't the cohesiveness it takes to inspire the public to rise up and demand our rights. Something's got to give, and soon. 

Sunday, January 3, 2021

weekend music #3

 





Endless Investigations By Republicans

I came to understand today that the greatest end game the Republicans are playing is not intended to overturn the election, but, for the party at large, to continue the strategy that cost Hillary Clinton the election in 2016. This not connected to the insanity of Trump, who likely seriously thought he could bully his way into a second term. The strategy of endless investigations of Democrats began in earnest when Bill Clinton was president, with Whitewater and such. But it only became a game-winner with Benghazi. They knew Hillary was innocent the whole time but managed to keep it all before the public for years, causing millions to distrust her. In fact, Benghazi still has potency for those millions. She is rightfully hated, in my opinion, but for different reasons.

In short, the Republicans will launch investigations into every Biden/Harris issue they come across, to instill distrust in the public. 

This post is not intended to generate affection for any Democrats. I honestly dislike both parties almost equally.     

Friday, January 1, 2021

RESOLUTION DEPARTMENT

 Foremost: Survive 2021.

New decade, same problems.

Resist, resist, resist, resist.

Demand help for your brothers and sisters.

Demand equality for your brothers and sisters.

Demand taxation for the rich.

Demand the right to vote in honest elections, recipient of most votes wins.

Demand government-funded healthcare.

Downfund and reorganize police and military and militarized government agencies, such as CIA and FBI.

Stop selling weapons on the international market. 

Quit destabilizing and orchestrating coups in legitimate governments.

etc. etc. etc.

Monday, December 28, 2020

Five Thousand Dollars

 While I believe $2,000 beats 200, I believe 5,000 for the ones behind on the rent would be right also. My best offer is to shut down the country while paying Americans to stay home, paying small businesses to stay solvent, and tax the fuck out of the richest citizens. Plus take back the tax breaks of big business. Tax those fuckers with no mercy. Bust up monopolies. Nationalize the utilities - virtually everything ever privatized. When it becomes time to reopen the country initiate massive public works projects as did Roosevelt. Oh yeah - and swap habitats between the children in cages and the federal government.

Friday, December 25, 2020

Beyond Time to Remove Trump

 In a saner world, Trump would no longer be allowed to hold the title of President. Hell, he wouldn't have been allowed to run for the office. He has long since crossed the line from being a servant of the people if any of his actions could ever be described as such. It's unfortunate that his party fears him and Pence is spineless. Speculating that we will make it beyond Biden's inauguration day, we likely will learn that the corruption lives on once Trump is gone because both are products of said corruption. But Biden does not want to destroy everything that catches his whims. He only wants to make us good ciphers in his capitalistic oligarch's wet dreams. Merry Christmas. 

Monday, December 21, 2020

A kick in the butt stimulus passes

 Here's exactly why Democrats win fewer elections and may be headed to extinction. Every time they have the power to accomplish anything for the people they plead weakness against those grinchy Republicans. Each cycle more voters see through the charade.

When anything is there for the taking, such as the stingy stimulus being offered, of course, we need to take it. But don't feel gratitude. Gather outside their homes and congress making angry sounds 24/7 until they note the dissatisfaction. Demand until they give.

Sunday, December 20, 2020

Sunday Music

 I think on Sundays I will post songs that have special meanings for me and many other people, beginning with Sam Cooke and Harry Belafonte.










Friday, December 18, 2020

Progressives Joining the Republican Party

 

by Russell Dobular

I know what you’re thinking: whaaaaaaaaaat!? But hear me out. The progressive case for voting Biden was best articulated by Noam Chomsky, and boiled down to this: as an activist, whether you like or don’t like a candidate or party doesn’t really enter into it. Your personal feelings must always be subordinated to your larger goals, and you should always vote based on which candidate is going to be the best vehicle for achieving your policy objectives. By that standard, I think there’s a good case to be made for progressives aligning themselves with the emerging economic populist wing of the GOP, and fighting its evangelical wing on cultural issues, rather than remaining within the Democratic Party and fighting its establishment on literally everything. Here’s why:

The Democratic Brand Is Toxic 

Between its cultural signaling and its constant failure to delver for its constituents, the party has lost the good will of essentially everyone who doesn’t live on the coasts, and even on the coasts, is only really popular in urban areas.  In my home state of New York, electoral maps show a bubble of New York City blue floating in an ocean of red, and the same goes for the entire Northeast, from Boston to Providence to Hartford.  Slapping the D on your campaign materials isn’t an asset in most places, it’s a liability.

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Republicans Win and It’s Only Going To Get Worse

Even in the face of a President who mostly seemed like he had just stepped out of a savage political farce about American politics that might have been written in the years before it actually happened, Joe Biden barely squeaked by. It took a once in a century pandemic and an unfathomably incompetent response from the administration to secure the Presidency for Democrats. But you can’t always count on an apocalypse.  Even with an ongoing sci-fi dystopia scenario playing out in real time, and even with record turn-out, which is theoretically supposed to favor Democrats, the party managed to lose Governorships, state legislatures, house seats, and some very winnable Senate races. Because of those losses, next year’s post-census redistricting will be done primarily by Republicans. By the time they’ve gotten through gerrymandering the country, there are going to be about 6 Democrats left in the House. The next shot at Congress will come in 2032, after the next census.  That sound like a star you want to hitch your wagon to?  Is that a party that’s going to serve as the best vehicle for pushing your agenda?

The GOP Lets Its Voters Decide: A Tale of Two Insurgents 

This is a subtle point, but a very important one, because it has an enormous impact on candidate selection and the degree to which GOP voters are able to influence the party’s legislative agenda.  In 2016, both parties were rocked by the unexpected rise of unlikely outsider candidates running on an economic populist agenda that was completely at odds with the ideology of their leadership.  In both cases, the media complexes that support those parties respectively tried to delegitimize the insurgents, and the parties ’ leading figures did everything they could to instruct their voters not to support them.  But in only one case did the party work behind the scenes to rig the primary process against one candidate.  And it wasn’t the GOP.  We know from Wikileaks and Donna Brazile, that the DNC conspired with the Clinton campaign to sink Bernie Sanders’ candidacy. This was in spite of the fact that there was no reason to believe that he would lose in a general election, based on the polling.  In fact, he generally outperformed Clinton in a theoretical match-up with Trump.  The GOP, on the other hand, had every reason to believe that Trump would be defeated in a landslide, no matter who emerged the victor on the Democratic side.  And yet, even in the face of not only a hostile takeover of their party, but in the face of an almost certain humiliating defeat, the GOP didn’t conspire against its own voters to secure a desired outcome.  Which means that if you’re supporting a candidate in a GOP primary who has the most volunteers and grass roots donations in history, and that candidate goes on to win the first 3 primary states, chances are they’re going to be the nominee.  On the other hand, as we saw again in 2020 with the Obama-orchestrated Monday night massacre, the Democratic Party will stop at nothing to prevent anyone who threatens to derail the revolving door gravy train from gaining any real power within their party.        

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Our Working Class Base Is In the GOP

It’s hard to run on economic populism inside a party dominated by upscale suburban liberals.  Sure, they’ll vaguely nod their heads and agree in the abstract on principles like M4A, and labor rights, but it isn’t something they really give two shits about. And let’s face it: the idea of working-class solidarity scares them.  Just like in some way the continued paranoia about Russia is based in ancient fears of the Mongol hordes swooping in from the steppe, the petit-bourgeois contempt for economic populism is based in their ancient class fear of being dragged from their homes by the impoverished masses and sent off to a political re-education camp. That’s a big part of why they’ve embraced the new religion of “critical race theory.”  People who are busy hating each other because of their skin color, can’t unite. It also helps to deflect from their class privilege when they spend all their political energy superficially denouncing their own race privilege.  Now, you might be saying that even if the working class is in the GOP, those voters represent a subset of the working class that’s hostile to social welfare programs. But if you’ve ever watched Bernie Sanders’ Fox News town hall, in which the audience applauds repeatedly for his entire agenda even with the hosts attempting to re-direct them back to the “socialist” boogeyman, you know that’s bs. It wouldn’t take much to win these people over. In fact, Trump already proved that by running to Clinton’s left on health care, trade, and war.  He didn’t mean any of it, but that doesn’t really matter in terms of evaluating the potency of an economic populist message among rank-and-file Republicans. Now imagine what someone who walked the walk instead of just talking the talk could do.

Thursday, December 17, 2020

Austerity for Us under Obama - Biden now?

 By David Sirota

As Americans continued to starve, face evictions and die during this week’s congressional showdown over desperately needed stimulus legislation, former President Barack Obama weighed in by trying to erase a historical cautionary tale that already seems to be happening again.

Looking back at the economic crisis during his first term, Obama told New York Magazine that he “was full Keynesian at that time in terms of trying to get as much stimulus out the door as quickly as possible” and that his critics were wrong to assume that the Democratic Party — which had full control of Congress — backed a smaller-than-necessary stimulus bill “based on some concerns about deficits at a time when that should have been the last thing we were worrying about.” 

“At the end of the day I had to get Ben Nelson’s vote, I had to get Arlen Specter’s vote, and I had to get Susan Collins’s vote — otherwise, I’m getting nothing,” Obama said, referring to conservative Democratic and Republican senators. “I’m making a decision to go ahead and take three-quarters of a loaf rather than have a lengthy fight for the whole loaf that even if I win could delay things significantly and hamper our ability to right the ship.”

The familiar message from Obama to Democratic Party voters is the same one the party’s apologists offer up today: Budget capitulations are not a product of ideological fealty to an austerity agenda, they are only a reflection of political reality — so stop pushing, start falling in line and be pragmatic.

On its face, it is a compelling tale that makes sense if you read nothing else and forgot what actually happened. The problem is, it omits a key detail that collapses the entire story and exposes the austerity ideology at play: In roughly the same time period, Obama and his party congratulated themselves for passing legislation that — in the name of deficit reduction — rescinded the White House’s authority to spend hundreds of billions of dollars to help Americans who were being thrown out of their homes. 

Called the “Pay It Back Act,” the Democratic bill reduced the size of the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) just after it had bailed out the banks, but just before a new president might decide to use the money for what it was originally supposed to do: help homeowners. 

Amid all the pain and suffering during the financial meltdown, Politico reported in 2009 that “the White House has signaled that it wants to dedicate 2010 to deficit reduction, and putting the bulk of TARP funds into paying down the debt could please budget hawks on the Hill.” 

Congressional Democrats the next year issued press releases lauding themselves for passing a bill to prevent the president from using the money to help people. The legislation reduced the amount of TARP funds available to be deployed, and required proceeds from the fund’s securities to be used “for the sole purpose of deficit reduction.”

“That's what people in my town hall meetings want,” insisted Colorado Democratic Sen. Michael Bennet, as foreclosures and budget cuts ravaged his state’s economy.

Obama signed the bill into law as part of the Dodd-Frank financial reform legislation, which was finalized just after the White House launching a commission to slash Social Security in the middle of the Great Recession. A few months later, Democrats were — in Obama’s own words — “shellacked” in the midterm elections. His administration then doubled down on austerity, quickly releasing a proposal for Social Security benefit cuts and pressing the Republican Congress to enact some of them. 

Meanwhile, millions suffered through an economic recovery that “was the slowest in post-World War II history, and the degree of fiscal austerity can entirely explain its slowness,” the Economic Policy Institute reported. 

The result was a popular backlash that ultimately created the conditions for the rise of Donald Trump.

Sadly, this is all lost history deliberately flushed down the memory hole in service of both helping Obama build his pristine media brand and pretending Democrats have not played a willful role in creating the destructive politics of austerity. 

And now, with no societal recollection of the debacle, this same cycle seems to be starting anew — and the broad strokes are eerily familiar.

A new administration entering office during an economic crisis that requires deficit spending. A Republican Party that instantly transitions from spending on corporate bailouts to pretending it cares about debt. A Washington-anchored Democratic Party that fetishizes deficit reduction so that cable news pundits will portray them as sober-minded fiscal hawks, rather than New Dealers. Wall Street executives and bondholders celebrate, serfs outside the palace walls starve, a counterrevolutionary backlash follows and the cycle starts anew.

This is the Austerity Loop that seems to be starting over again — proving that when we forget our past, history may not exactly repeat itself, but it tends to rhyme. 

“They Spent Months Signaling Their Willingness To Climb Down Off Key Demands”

As in the 2008-2009 period, we face an unprecedented economic crisis, prompting Republicans to disingenuously pretend to be fiscal conservatives, and Democrats to follow their lead rather than pivoting to a New Deal posture. 

Democrats’ stimulus negotiations tells the larger tale: After eagerly signing on to help Trump pass legislation creating a $500 billion corporate slush fund, the party led by golf-clapping master strategist Nancy Pelosi negotiated a potential $3.4 trillion economic rescue package down first to $1.9 trillion

As poverty and mass starvation skyrocketed, Pelosi’s Democrats then rejected Trump’s offer of $1.8 trillion and negotiated further down to $348 billion. Now, Congress is down to a mere $188 billion in new proposed spending — cue tweets of Pelosi putting on sunglasses

Vox reported that the bill released Monday did not “include another round of $1,200 stimulus checks — a very popular provision that was left out to reduce the cost of the package.” But hey, at least it included a massive bailout for profitable defense contractors. Late Wednesday, there was word that there may be some direct stimulus aid included in the bill, but the checks would be smaller and paid for with more austerity — specifically, by slashing unemployment benefits.

“Dems did basically none of the things you'd normally want to do to pressure the other side,” tweeted Adam Jentleson, who advised former Senate Democratic Majority Leader Harry Reid. “Instead of anything resembling a pressure campaign on popular policies like the checks, they spent months signaling their willingness to climb down off key demands.”

Sen. Bernie Sanders put it more bluntly: “What kind of negotiation is it when you go from $3.4 trillion to $188 billion in new money? That is not a negotiation. That is a collapse.”

As Sanders now gets the cold shoulder from conservative Democrats and is left to work with freshman Republican Sen. Josh Hawley to push for more direct aid, his analysis is unnecessarily polite. The Vermont senator’s own experience successfully fighting Democrats’ past push to cut Social Security suggests this is not an inadvertent collapse, but instead a deliberate and sinister assertion of the party’s austerity ideology that Obama pretended doesn’t exist. 

It is an ideology with the elite in mind: Democrats fear being tagged as spendthrifts by millionaire MSNBC hosts, they are afraid to call out GOP hypocrisy on spending, and they refuse to embrace the kind of Keynesianism that even Trump himself championed

Since the Clinton era, Democrats have been zealous followers of the austerity religion. They aim to satiate Wall Street, bondholders, austerian think tanks and Washington pundits who fetishize balanced budgets — and who are more than happy to bail out corporations while reducing the national debt through huge cuts to programs that provide the most basic necessities of life.

“The Pantry Is Going To Be Bare” 

When Biden is sworn in as president, he could end this vicious Austerity Loop. He could follow through on his campaign promises for robust investments in infrastructure, climate mitigation and an expansion of Social Security, which would boost economists like Stephanie Kelton and others who have been working to try to break the vise grip that anti-deficit ideologues have maintained on American politics for decades.

But while Biden did momentarily tout deficit spending at the very end of the campaign, let’s be honest: There are signs that when it comes to austerity politics, he remains much more focused on delivering on his promise to make sure that nothing will fundamentally change

First, there was one of Biden’s top aides telling Washington reporters that Trump-created deficits means “the pantry is going to be bare” and “we’re going to be limited” in what the government can spend money on, which is nonsense. 

Then Biden reportedly pressed congressional Democrats to accept a far-too-small stimulus package, in order to appease Republicans. Of late, he has not been aggressively campaigning for the $1,200 stimulus checks — he has been busy asking for $1 million corporate checks for his Zoom-call inauguration

Biden will be entering office just after Trump Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin pulled a spiteful redux of Democrats’ previous move on TARP by preemptively rescinding the executive branch’s authority to deploy more resources to boost the economy. Handcuffed by a narrowly divided Senate, the new president could counter by using executive authority to cancel student debt and expand Medicare — both of which could inject billions of dollars into the economy. 

And yet, Biden is already suggesting that he is looking to avoid moves that might spark a legal clash over executive power. Indeed, rather than saying he will do whatever it takes to help millions of Americans, he recently told civil rights leaders that “executive authority that my progressive friends talk about is way beyond the bounds.” 

At the same time, he has ruled out pushing Medicare for All during a burgeoning health care emergency, even as a new Congressional Budget Office report shows the program could save America $650 billion every year. 

As for appointments, Biden’s economic team includes nominees with a long record of pushing austerity.

There is Treasury Secretary nominee Janet Yellen — who has at times supported some necessary deficit spending and financial regulation, but who previously pushed spending cuts, called the debt “unsustainable,” and co-authored an op-ed calling for “adjustments in both spending and revenue” for Social Security.

There is Biden’s choice to chair the White House Council of Economic Advisers, Cecilia Rouse — who pushed spending cuts and balanced budgets in 2012. 

There is BlackRock executive Brian Deese set to run the National Economic Council — a job he comes to after serving as an Obama official promising Congress “that his top priority would be working on a ‘comprehensive deficit reduction agreement,’ which would include ‘entitlement reform,’” according to the American Prospect.

And there is Office of Management and Budget nominee Neera Tanden, who touted Social Security cuts after Republicans won Congress in 2010. 

Perhaps all of this would be less troubling had Biden been a staunch defender of programs like Social Security — but he has been the opposite. For decades, Biden has been one of the Democratic Party’s most ardent proponents of austerity politics to the point where he gave speeches on the Senate floor bragging about his work with Republicans to try to cut Social Security. 

This record was briefly scrutinized during the Democratic primary, but Biden brazenly lied his way through the controversy, the national press laughed about it, pundits downplayed it, partisan Democrats scoffed at it, and now here we are with a president and a Senate Majority leader whose Venn diagram shows common ground on one big policy: slashing the government’s already meager spending on the tattered social safety net.

“Turning The COVID Recession Into A Depression”

Democratic Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar, and Rashida Tlaib seem to sense the dangerous resurgence of austerity politics, and in response they mounted a pressure campaign demanding Biden avoid giving a top White House job to Bruce Reed — the executive director of Obama’s commission to cut Social Security.

“Putting someone who will prioritize paying down the deficit ahead of all other concerns in charge is a recipe for cutting our earned benefits and turning the COVID recession into a depression,” they wrote in an open letter.

But austerity politics quickly reared its head, when some of Washington’s most servile courtiers expressed shock, dismay and horror that these lawmakers would dare challenge the orthodoxy.

“What a weird fight to pick,” tweeted professional palace stenographer Ryan Lizza. “Reed is being attacked by the left for serving as a staffer on a bipartisan blue ribbon commission years ago rather than being applauded as one of the key policy architects of the most progressive agenda in modern history.” 

The campaign against Reed was ultimately successful — he was passed over for a top job, but it went to Tanden instead, making the victory feel monumentally smaller. 

Today, austerity extremism remains embedded in the Democratic House caucus, thanks to Pelosi. She has championed so-called PAYGO rules that require new expenditures to be paid for with budget cuts, thereby making it almost impossible for lawmakers to deficit spend to counter an economic downturn. 

“For the Congressional Progressive Caucus, the PAYGO rule should be viewed as a declaration of war against its agenda. A Green New Deal, Medicare for All, tuition-free college, and debt forgiveness would all be made less likely to succeed under this House rule,” wrote Bernie Sanders’ aide Ari Rabin-Havt. “The current Democratic majority in the House of Representatives should be willing to spend as much as possible to grow the economy.”

Warning of another Austerity Loop that replays the 2010 electoral disaster, Rabin-Havt concludes: “With a thin majority, the midterm elections will already put control of the chamber in peril. The irony is that the members who will likely push for the PAYGO rule — moderates from swing districts — are the ones who will be put most at risk by its existence. The worst political strategy Democrats could deploy over the next two years would be to go small when it comes to domestic spending.” 

The politics of the situation are still in flux — Ocasio-Cortez, Omar, Tlaib and other progressive lawmakers seem determined to prevent the austerity orthodoxy from creating an electoral massacre in 2022. They and other Congressional Progressive Caucus members are right now demanding bigger checks in the final stimulus bill. 

On the other side of the partisan divide, Republicans such as Hawley and Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton have followed Trump’s lead by periodically trying to outflank Democrats and push even bigger infusions of direct aid to families during the pandemic. That could leave a Biden-led Democratic Party that seeks balanced budgets vulnerable to being cast as newfangled Hoover-like austerians sapping the lifeblood out of a battered economy.  

Whatever happens in the political sphere, a replay of the Austerity Loop in the short term will have real-world consequences for millions of Americans, who desperately need some sort of financial lifeline as economic, health care and housing crises grind them into the dust. 

In the long term, the stakes are even higher — the only way to try to stop a potential extinction event like climate change is to make far-reaching investments that transform our entire energy economy, food system and infrastructure. The Austerity Loop prevents that — which is why it must be broken.

Whether or not it will be remains the open question. 

For a generation, rank-and-file voters have been told to eat budget cuts while the wealthy feast on tax breaks, subsidies, bailouts and other government largesse. There was another way forward during and after the financial crisis of 2008, but Democrats deliberately blocked themselves from taking that path. Now they have another chance to back countercyclical spending that helps Americans afford the most basic necessities of life. 

Our country did that during the Great Depression and we can do it again, but only if Democratic leaders finally recognize the Austerity Loop for what it really is: just another scheme that deliberately perpetuates an untenable status quo.